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tv   [untitled]    August 30, 2012 7:07pm-7:37pm PDT

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>> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here. >> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco.
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it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundary of what was possible, out word. >> there were parades and rallies, door to door candidacies, reaching every voter in the state. >> the eyes of the nation were on california in 1911, when we all voted. it was the sixth and largest
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state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their
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voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years
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of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this is how it would have addressed. and here we are, dressed the same. [chanting] >> we have the right to vote. >> whether you are marching for a cause or voting in the next election, make your voice heard. thank you for watching.
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>> we all sound very excited because we have some special guests. we have nearly -- mayor lee. [applause] and we also have our very own superintendent coranza. i am sure you want to hear a few words from the superintendent, correct? from mayor lee? the spring them a warm harvey milk will come. -- let us give them a warm harvey milk will come. >> good morning, everybody.
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welcome back to harvey milk academy. it is my pleasure to join all of you, the students, parents, faculty, and school administration, to kick off a wonderful year. how many students want to be mayor of san francisco? how about a mayor from the civil rights academy of harvey milk? we would be proud of that. i want to welcome everybody back. i know you had a great summer. i want you to approach this school like a sponge, soak up everything that you can learn. it is great to have knowledge about everything going on in the world, what is going on in the city. by the way, i will be supporting your parents and teachers and faculty to make this the best school in san francisco. how about that?
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[applause] and you are starting out fantastic. this is what san francisco is about. all the parents involved children and faculty to make this the best school. you have a mayor that will pay attention to our school, education, make sure you get the best education, because i want you to have my job some day. how about that? welcome back, welcome to the great school of harvey milk. you have a wonderful faculty who is going to teach you and expose you to a lot of different things to keep you active. we are going to help the city make sure your after-school programs are solid. thank you and have a great year. welcome back. [applause] >> thank you, mayor lee. superintendent coranza.
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[applause] >> good morning, boys and girls. we can do better than that. when i say good morning, i want to yell as loud as you can. good morning. >> good morning! >> that is beautiful. are you excited to be back in school? and one more time, good morning. >> good morning! >> we are excited to be here with the mayor who has a busy schedule. i will tell you why we wanted to be here at harvey milk. harvey milk looks like san francisco. it is the most diverse school in our district. it is a beautiful school. you know what is also great about harvey milk? we know, based on last year's assessment, we predict harvey milk will have great growth in student achievement again this
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year. isn't that great? [applause] that is great because we know it does not happen without the wonderful teachers you have. so i want you to be sure to listen and pay attention to your teacher this year and do what they say. if you do, they will prepare you to be mayor one day or superintendent one day, or president one day. so listen to your teachers. you have a great principle. she fights for you every single day to make sure you have your resources to be successful. i brought some people with me that wanted to come and see harvey milk civil rights academy. these are people i work very closely with but they are so excited to be here because they heard about all the good news and all the good stuff here at harvey milk civil rights academy. first is our board member. hydra mendoza.
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the other person is the assistant superintendent that supervises harvey milk's above its academy, margaret chu. [applause] i also brought with me the deputies said pete produce superintendent for so solid justice, mr. garrido. this is such a special school, i brought two deputy superintendent. the other deputy is in charge of policy and operations. myung lee. he is jumping back there. does anybody here want to be a lawyer? oh, come on, parents. this is so special, we brought the general counsel, the big lawyer in the district. his name is don davis, and he is over there. and then our director of
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communications is a factor as well. -- back there as well. why do i introduce the people to you? because we are so proud of harvey milk civil-rights academy, we all wanted to be here on the first day of school. this is not the last time you will see us. we want to come back to read in the classrooms. i understand you do a school dance. maybe we get invited to do that. we want you to have a great school year. q want to thank all of you parents for all that you do. we cannot do this without you. let's have a great year. yay! [applause] >> thank you. we have traditions here at harvey milk. one of the traditions is a dance that we do. boys and girls, what do you do? tell us what we do.
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>> the cuban shuffle. >> come to the middle if you are going to do the cuban shuffle. this is a dance that we do. parents, teachers, come on up. ♪
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>> what if you could make a memorial that is more about information and you are never fixed and it can go wherever it wants to go? everyone who has donated to it could use it, host it, share it. >> for quite a great deal of team she was hired in 2005, she struggled with finding the correct and appropriate visual expression. >> it was a bench at one point. it was a darkened room at another point. but the theme always was a theme of how do we call people's attention to the issue of speci species extinction. >> many exhibits do make long detailed explanations about
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species decline and biology of birds and that is very useful for lots of purposes. but i think it is also important to try to pull at the strings inside people. >> missing is not just about specific extinct or endangered species. it is about absence and a more fundamental level of not knowing what we are losing and we need to link species loss to habitat loss and really focuses much on the habitat. >> of course the overall mission of the academy has to do with two really fundamental and important questions. one of which is the nature of life. how did we get here? the second is the challenge of sustainability. if we are here how are we going to find a way to stay? these questions resonated very
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strongly with maya. >> on average a species disappears every 20 minutes. this is the only media work that i have done. i might never do another one because i'm not a media artist per se but i have used the medium because it seemed to be the one that could allow me to convey the sounds and images here. memorials to me are different from artworks. they are artistic, but memorials have a function. >> it is a beautiful scupltural objective made with bronze and lined with red wood from water tanks in clear lake. that is the scupltural form that gives expression to maya's project. if you think about a cone or a bull horn, they are used to get the attention of the crowd,
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often to communicate an important message. this project has a very important message and it is about our earth and what we are losing and what we are missing and what we don't even know is gone. >> so, what is missing is starting with an idea of loss, but in a funny way the shape of this cone is, whether you want to call it like the r.c.a. victor dog, it is listen to the earth and what if we could create a portal that could look at the past, the present and the future? >> you can change what is then missing by changing the software, by changing what is projected and missing. so, missing isn't a static installation. it is an installation that is going to grow and change over time. and she has worked to bring all of this information together from laboratory after laboratory including, fortunately, our great fwroup of researche e-- g researchers at the california academy. >> this couldn't have been more
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site specific to this place and we think just visually in terms of its scupltural form it really holds its own against the architectural largest and grandeur of the building. it is an unusual compelling object. we think it will draw people out on the terrace, they will see the big cone and say what is that. then as they approach the cone tell hear these very unusual sounds that were obtained from the cornell orinthology lab. >> we have the largest recording of birds, mammals, frogs and insects and a huge library of videos. so this is an absolutely perfect opportunity for us to team up with a world renown, very creative inspirational artist and put the sounds and sights of the animals that we study into a brand-new context, a context that really allows people to appreciate an esthetic way of
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the idea that we might live in the world without these sounds or sites. >> in the scientific realm it is shifting baselines. we get used to less and less, diminished expectations of what it was. >> when i came along lobsters six feet long and oysters 12 inches within they days all the oyster beds in new york, manhattan, the harbor would clean the water. so, just getting people to wake up to what was just literally there 200 years ago, 150 years ago. you see the object and say what is that. you come out and hear these intriguing sounds, sounds like i have never heard in my life. and then you step closer and you almost have a very intimate experience. >> we could link to different institutions around the globe, maybe one per continent, maybe two or three in this country,
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then once they are all networked, they begin to communicate with one another and share information. in 2010 the website will launch, but it will be what you would call an informational website and then we are going to try to, by 2011, invite people to add a memory. so in a funny way the member rely grows and there is something organic about how this memorial begins to have legs so to speak. so we don't know quite where it will go but i promise to keep on it 10 years. my goal is to raise awareness and then either protect forests from being cut down or reforest in ways that promote biodiversity. >> biodiverse city often argued to be important for the world's human populations because all of the medicinal plants and uses that we can put to it and fiber that it gives us and food that it gives us.
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while these are vital and important and worth literally hundreds of billions of dollars, the part that we also have to be able to communicate is the more spiritual sense of how important it is that we get to live side by side with all of these forms that have three billion years of history behind them and how tragic it would be not commercially and not in a utilitarian way but an emotio l emotional, psychological, spiritual way if we watch them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes.
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>> thank you and welcome everybody to today's announcement of my appointment to the city college board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good friend, someone who graduated from my alma mater, somebody who worked with for many years, he has been part of the elected city family for the city college for over a decade. of course, that is mr. marks. you want to give our condolences and certainly acknowledge milton's contribution to our college, not only to his family, community, to the environment that he terrorist so much, but also to
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the institution of our city college that he worked so hard to improve. he took up the mantle, especially in the hard times when it was challenging already. i had a chance to express that to abby last week and let her know that we were thinking about >> thank you and welcome everybody to today's announcement of my appointment to the city college board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good him, certainly, were blessed with the many years of service that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim
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chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our public financing, and certainly kate howard and the budget staff, all here to
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help me help the city college to make sure they continue in the best tradition that we have in our city. after all, they need our help, our support. they will not be able to accomplish it all by themselves, so no less than any other educational institution. they cannot do it alone. certainly, i get that message from hydra a lot. working with her on the board of education, as well as her being at the city college at this time, and then with our community assets, read it is here at the head of children, youth, and family. she has been a critical part of the programs that support our educational institutions and will be similarly so when we meet the challenges of our community college. our community colleges, as i say earlier, is the really important
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part. let me tell you how important. 90,000 students come through city college. we cannot let that fail. we will not let that fail. [applause] it is, i think, california's finest example of a true, urban community college. it serves 90,000 students, it has nine major maker of campuses, and more than 100 institutional instruction sites throughout the city of san francisco. and it has that because it wants to make itself available to every resident of san francisco and make it accessible by transportation, by bike or by foot, but also and most importantly, it becomes accessible because it is affordable and it is high quality. it has 815 full-time staff over
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1035 part-time staff, and over 900 classified employees. offers affordable opportunities for san franciscans to earn associate degrees, to prepare for a transfer to hire institutions, or to pursue a career in technical education, over 50 academic programs, 100 occupational disciplines. city college also offers distance learning and free non- credit courses in many fields. and for us in san francisco, for what i have been doing in the last year and half, it offers and empowers from our city those economic sectors that we consider most of valuable for our future. especially in the areas of health care, hospitality,
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biotech, and the technology in general. we have become dependent on city college for their ability to prepare the future work forces and because of the outstanding training that the college of fords, our economic future is directly tied to the success of our city college. so it is with that that i am presenting today a very important decision. in recognizing the importance of our city college to us as a city, i also want to make sure that we recognize as a family the serious challenges that are before the trustees and before the interim chancellor as we would care to meet them. there will be very difficult and important decision that will need to be made in order to address the recommendations that are set forth by the
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accreditation committee. there will also be a lot of good faith negotiation that will have to happen in order to protect our city college. but tough decisions and reforms are what city college needs at this time. and we must first protect and serve the students of city college and make sure they remain have our number one priority. but any improvement means change from the status quo. it will also mean decisions about reform, decisions reflecting strong leadership and good governance that will improve our city college system and protect this accreditation. to that end, i have given very careful consideration about who to appoint to fill this vacancy at such a critical time in our city college history. we need somebody who shares my vision of reform and some who will make the tough choices ahead. today i am proud to appoint rodrigo santos as the new trus

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